7 mindful steps to finding the right therapist for you

7 mindful steps to finding the right therapist for you

Deciding to work with a therapist is often a big decision ... 

And then once the decision has made to seek help, it can be a daunting task to find a therapist that is right for you.

In this article, we identify seven steps to help you find the therapist that is more likely to meet your needs.

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The Power of Sharing Stories

The Power of Sharing Stories

In our work we are constantly inspired by incredible growth and transformation that can happen in client's lives.  This month we invited our newsletter subscribers to submit their stories of growth.   With the hope that these stories may inspire you and others, we are publishing a selection of these stories to our blog.  

But then, by chance we came across this incredible resource, that is offering a similar collective of inspiration, but on a much larger scale...be touched, be inspired, educate yourself and others, check out...The Mighty...

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Learning how to 'ground' - a path to meet anxiety.

Learning how to 'ground' - a path to meet anxiety.

As the year starts to roll on and the pressures of life ramp up, many people can begin to feel anxious about their capacity to cope.  Anxiety is often a response to a feeling out of control or overwhelmed.  To help combat this feeling of anxiety, it can be helpful to develop skills around 'grounding'.

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Stress & Anxiety – some simple steps to overcome this state of being…Part 1

Stress & Anxiety – some simple steps to overcome this state of being…Part 1

In my work, I meet a lot of people who described themselves as “stressed”, “not-coping”, “anxious”, and often in these states, fear that there is something that is terribly wrong with them for this to be happening in their world. 

In this short post, I will outline some simple lifestyle changes you can make that are likely to reduce your stress levels.

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Counselling – An Act of Courage.

adolescent, counselling, st kilda east, courage, megan rees, sarah sacks, the grove counselling, bayside

Sitting across from me in my counselling room is a young man who twirls a thread, dangling from the knee of his jeans, as he stares uncomfortably down at the carpet.  When he’s done with that he absent-mindedly pulls at the hairs on his arm, not that long ago they were pale and downy but recently they darkened and became coarser.

There are a million other places he’d rather be than sitting and talking to a child and adolescent counsellor, but “Tom” (not his real name) has reluctantly agreed to come because he’s tired of how he feels. He’s sick of being asked what’s wrong and would tell them, if only he knew himself. Sure, he gets that exams are stressful and the kids at school can be d%*#heads sometimes, but there is more to it than that. Only it’s hard to tackle it, when you don’t yet know, what it is.

And whilst I sit with him, witness to his anguish and vulnerability, I am profoundly aware of the strength it has taken for this young person to simply turn up today. Coming to counselling is an act of bravery. To commit to a process, to change how your life feels, is seriously admirable. For some, the amount of courage that needs to be summoned to speak with a therapist can be huge. And during the tumultuous teenage years, the decision to ‘give it a go’, I believe is even more commendable.

However, it never ceases to amaze me how that risk pays off. As the therapeutic rapport grows, we gently explore that which we have ignored, suppressed or denied. In time this affords us incredible liberation as we gain a greater sense of control over how we deal with our experiences and relationships. The sense of relief at moving through depression, anxiety, loss, grief, compulsive behaviours or anger, can be life changing.

Counselling can be hard work; no doubt about it and having concerns about how that might feel is perfectly understandable. But hang in there because the discomfort is worth it.

I have enormous respect for Tom finding the courage to show up for therapy and I admire his trust in the process. Together, we work to make the experience of counselling, worth the risk he took.

(Specialising in working with children & adolescents, Megan Rees, works from her practice The Grove Counselling, located in the Melbourne bayside suburb of St Kilda East .)

If this content interests you and you would like to receive regular updates of developments at The Grove, please leave your details in the "Subscribe" box to your right.

 

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Sarah Sacks

Sarah is a qualified and experienced counsellor, meditation teacher and group facilitator. Sarah's years of body based based practices, in meditation and yoga, have led Sarah to believe in the inherent wisdom of the body. In line with this belief, Sarah has trained and qualified as a Whole Body Focusing Orientated Therapist, Transpersonal Counsellor, Holistic Counsellor, Meditation Teacher and Group Psychotherapy Facilitation. Over the last 5 years Sarah has worked in the not-for-profit sector, the community health sector and privately, as a generalist counsellor and group facilitator. Sarah has experience working with children, families and adults around issues of; isolation, anxiety, depression, grief, loss, trauma, anger, separation, addiction and general mental health. Sarah's warm and intuitive counselling style, along with her extensive life experience, enables Sarah to gently support her clients towards their own path of change. Qualifications - Bachelor of Holistic Counselling, Diploma of Transpersonal Counselling, Bachelor of Business (International Marketing & Trade), Diploma of Arts (Japanese), ACA (level 2), qualifying member for CAPAV

What is your relationship with alcohol…?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gagilas/9679978277/sizes/l/

Last night, I found myself seeking a glass of wine.  Usually only drinking socially, I was alone in the kitchen preparing dinner for the family.  It had been a busy day…what was this seeking of an experience altering substance about?

Growing up in rural Australia, alcohol has always been present in my life.  My father drank to alleviate the stress and pain of history written in his body.  My mother drank to be with my father.  I drank to because that is what everyone did once they hit adolescence.  Alcohol was always present.  At dinner, at events, at celebrations, at commiserations, whenever adults were gathered there was always alcohol.  It was a “social thing” ….or was it?

As children, we live moment to moment, and those moments define our experience.  Whether it be joy in discovering the first egg laid by the family chooks in spring, or the rage of injustice as one sibling crosses the other…children live in their experiences.   Yet in our growing up, it appears that some children learn that both the pain and the ecstasy of life are too much and that rather than learning how to regulate their experiences, they begin to seek distraction and in time disconnection from these highs and lows of life.

At the extreme, modeled in; alcohol dependence, excessive food consumption, cigarette addiction, overwork, social media obsession, or perhaps our inability to be alone…as adults, we demonstrate to our children how to disengage from truly living in experience. 

This learning to disconnect from experience however is multi-faceted.  As parents, as teachers, as caregivers in a child’s life, being unable to simply be with a child, regardless of whether it is meeting the child at their best or at their worst, if we, as adults can not tolerate a child’s experience, how will a child learn to tolerate their own?  It is in how we respond to the child in their distress, with acceptance, with love and with care, that they discover their own capacity to self regulate.

Pause and take time to be with our own experiences and with the experiences of the young people around us.  This is an investment in both ourselves and the generations to come. 

Reflection: “What is your relationship with alcohol or similar detractors from experience?”

(As a Wholebody Focusing oriented therapist, Sarah Sacks actively supports her clients to come into relationship with their experience)

If this content interests you and you would like to receive regular updates of developments at The Grove, please leave your details in the "Subscribe" box to your right.

 

Comment

Sarah Sacks

Sarah is a qualified and experienced counsellor, meditation teacher and group facilitator. Sarah's years of body based based practices, in meditation and yoga, have led Sarah to believe in the inherent wisdom of the body. In line with this belief, Sarah has trained and qualified as a Whole Body Focusing Orientated Therapist, Transpersonal Counsellor, Holistic Counsellor, Meditation Teacher and Group Psychotherapy Facilitation. Over the last 5 years Sarah has worked in the not-for-profit sector, the community health sector and privately, as a generalist counsellor and group facilitator. Sarah has experience working with children, families and adults around issues of; isolation, anxiety, depression, grief, loss, trauma, anger, separation, addiction and general mental health. Sarah's warm and intuitive counselling style, along with her extensive life experience, enables Sarah to gently support her clients towards their own path of change. Qualifications - Bachelor of Holistic Counselling, Diploma of Transpersonal Counselling, Bachelor of Business (International Marketing & Trade), Diploma of Arts (Japanese), ACA (level 2), qualifying member for CAPAV